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20121201
20121231
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2012 8:00am PST
those things? and that machine can only throw the baseball at 30 meters per second. that's how fast. 30 meters per second. it's all regulated to throw that fast. now, it's gonna throw a ball to you. you got your catcher's mitt. hit, boom, you catch. how fast do you catch it? 30 meters per second, right? that's because the machine is at relative rest to you. there's no motion between you and the machine. so you're gonna catch it at 30 meters per second. now, let's suppose you are in a truck and the truck is going that way at 10 meters per second. 10, get that? i throw the ball just like before. you catch it. how fast it's going? well, check your neighbor. you're going away. you're moving away from it. faster or slower, gang? slower. - in fact, what's the answer? - 20. you're gonna catch it at 20, 20 minutes per second, right? aboutish? let's suppose you turn the truck around and you come toward the ball-throwing machine and the ball-throwing machine throws just like before to 30, but you're now moving this way at 10 meters per second. when you catch the ball, that ball's gonna hit yo
LINKTV
Dec 31, 2012 8:00am PST
ways to shut that whole thing down. >> what i want to know is [inaudible] >> what is at stake is not some material thing called the planet or environment. what is at stake is tearing down our children's futures. >> today, we look back at 2012. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. today, we look back at 2012, and the most expensive election in u.s. history. president obama defeated mitt romney forcing the republicans to reconsider their policies among others returning women and immigrants. while the major party presidential candidate did not take on fossil fuel, climate change in any of their debates, it was a year of extrem e weathr from melting of the arctic to superstorm sandy to the massive typhoon in the philippines. 2012 will also be remembered for a series of mass shootings from aurora, arata, to the sikh temple, to be shooting in newtown, conn.. the case around trayvon martin sparked national protest after officials refused to arrest george zimmerman. president obama continues his secret drone wars. w
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2012 3:00pm PST
doubt. "i have found something interesting to work at and time to do it." for almost three decades, winslow homer made his home on prouts neck, a rocky point just south of portland, maine. his house still stands on the high ground overlooking the sea. visiting thelace where homer lived and worked is john wilmerding, deputy director of the national gallery of art. homer's studio was a remodeled stable set about 200 yards from a large summerhouse thatis older brother bought in 1883. although homer was close to his family, he enjoyed the solitude his studio provided, but most of all, it was the ocean outside which reall made this place so important to him. the love of nature was very much a part of homer's time. his family joined the growing number of americans in the late 19th century who could afford to escape the city heat and spend summers at the shore. homer's relatives on both sides had been engaged in shipping and trading for generations. his father, charles savage homer, carried on an import business. his mother, henrietta benson homer, was a watercolorist whose flower picture
WHUT
Dec 5, 2012 6:00pm EST
today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after headlines. new clashes have erupted in egypt in the ongoing uproar over a proposed referendum on a new constitution. on tuesday, thousands took to the streets to protest egyptian president mohamed mursi's effort to hold a referendum vote later this month after asserting wide- ranging powers, protecting him from judicial oversight. egyptian forces fired tear gas at protesters, some of whom broke through lines to approach the president. the rally coincided with a one- day strike from newspapers. the united nations is warning food shortages are growing in syria as a result of rising prices and mo
LINKTV
Dec 17, 2012 3:00pm PST
. >> in the deadliest rampage at an elementary school in u.s. history, 20 kindergarten students and six staff members of the school are killed in newtown, connecticut. >> i have been at this for one- third of a century, and my sensibilities may not be of the average man, but this probably is the worst i have seen or the worst that i know of any of my colleagues have seen. >> the massacre occurred in newtown, connecticut, just miles from the national shooting sports foundation, the nation's second most powerful pro-gun lobby in the country after the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "d
WHUT
Dec 28, 2012 6:00pm EST
cliff. no to a cat food christmas. >> as president obama meets with congressional leaders at the white house, we speak outgoing democratic congress member dennis kucinich about the so- called fiscal cliff and a bill to continue the controversial domestic surveillance program. then, will the government -- of nerve north carolina pardon the wilmington 10? >> it is not a secret an injustice has been done. now, governor perdue has an opportunity to right the wrong. we cannot go back to 1980. this is 2012. >> the north carolina governor is being urged to pardon a group of civil rights activists were falsely convicted and imprisoned 40 years ago for the firebombing of a white owned grocery store. the conviction was overturned in 1980, but the state has never pardon them. we will speak with one of the wilmington 10 who served eight years behind bars and it became head of the naacp. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama is set to meet with congressional leaders at the white house just three d
LINKTV
Dec 11, 2012 3:00pm PST
and look at all of this behind me. i've been hearin' about this place, readin' about this place, seein' pictures of this place for years now, but this is my first opportunity to actually spend some time here and it is overwhelming. and if you think this is beautiful, look over here. this is otherworldly. it's spectacular. it's magnificent. and ron, you're the superintendent of this place. where are we right now? >> we are at red cliffs natural preserve in red rock canyon state park, and this red rock canyon state park is 27,000 acres of beautiful cliffs that you see here in the background. >> well, now, when you say "beautiful cliffs," that's the understatement. what are we lookin' at? why is it this color? and i assume this is why red rock canyon got its name. >> that is correct, huell. the area here has a transverse fault called the garlock fault that comes off the sierra nevadas and tehachapi mountains, and this area was covered with a lot of sand and sedimentary rock many, many years ago in the miocene, the pliocene era. well, then, later came a volcanic surge and laid over
LINKTV
Dec 19, 2012 3:00pm PST
to wait for another massacre? are we going to have this discussion six months, another year, 12, at 13, 20, 100 people die? we cannot wait any more. >> do your congress member carolyn mccarthy lost her husband 19 years ago and the long island rail road massacre. her son was gravely wounded. she's become a leading advocate for gun control as pro-gun politicians and lobbyists fall silent. there is a seismic shift that could lead to gun control legislation. we will ask her. then we look at the fight to save social security as negotiations of the so-called fiscal cliff intensified. >> i do believe the opportunity is there, the parameters of the deal are clear, the path to a compromise is clear. and he hopes the republicans will meet him on that path and do something that would be very good for the american people, for the middle class, and our economy. >> we will speak with arizona congressmember are raul grijalva on his opposition to president obama's plan to cut more from social security than the military. in an exclusive interview with native american activist leonard peltier from pr
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
public at large, and so we monitor health status in a much broader sense. our job is to watch the health of the american public, and when we see disturbances in the health of the american public, when we see diseases, our job is to try to figure out why they occur and how to both control them-- but more importantly, to prevent them. people often ask why this large public agency is located in atlanta instead of the nation's capital. we are the only major government agency that is not headquartered in washington, dc, and both the fact that we're not in washington as well as the date that we were established, tells you something about our history. in 1946, troops were returning home from europe and the pacific after world war ii. the joy of their return was tempered by public health concerns about what might be arriving with them. would their homecoming also reintroduce diseases that had been erased from the national scene? in the southeastern part of the united states, up until well into the 20th century, this was an area that had malaria. there was a lot of concern that as soldiers return
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2012 8:00am PST
throwing higher and higher velocity particles at matter, three people in germany, lisa meitner, otto hahn, otto-- strassman, i think, anyway, what they did was they threw slow moving neutrons at uranium isotopes and they found a reaction that changed the world. and the reaction that changed the world is that what you see before you here. it's in your textbooks. the first page in the chapter, fission and fusion. and all we're saying is that it turns out if a slow moving neutron taps into uranium 235 isotope-- [makes sounds] --it will lay it right in half, and the isotopes, instead of a little particle coming off like maybe a proton or an alpha particle, the whole things falls on half. wild. and-- [makes sounds] here's a typical reaction. there are many reactions. this is just the typical one. the uranium busts in half into krypton and barium. these are about halfway down the periodic table from where the uranium is. and the neat thing was, is there were also an ejection in the average of about three more neutrons. now, if you can slow these neutrons down-- they're going kinda fa
LINKTV
Dec 3, 2012 8:00am PST
make a choice at station time. and victoria-saurus is ready to go make a choice. zaria-saurus can go make a choice at a station. hendrick: it's wonderful when we can count on children to do the right thing because they want to, not because they have to. one of the best ways to make this happen is to provide as many opportunities as possible for youngsters to make their own choices and decisions. we have to keep in mind that whenever we give a child a choice, we should be prepared to honor their decision. so, we better think carefully before we offer one. boy: i got to go there, david. woman: "excuse me" is the word we say, and then we ask the person to move. "excuse me" is a way of letting them know you need to be in that space. you don't need to push them away. boy: i hate this! this ain't working. woman: if you want to make another choice, there's other stations open. uh-uh, uh-uh, uh-uh. hendrick: how many times have we caught ourselves asking no-win questions, such as "would you like," or "would you do it, o.k.?" and then we don't like the answer? we've asked children to make a c
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 8:00am PST
had a concussion at the bridge. my legs went out from under me. i felt like i was going to die. i thought i saw death. all these many years later, i don't recall how i made it back across that bridge to the church. but after i got back to the church, the church was full to capacity, more than 2,000 people on the outside trying to get in to protest what had happened on the bridge. and someone asked me to say something to the audience. and i stood up and said something like: "i don't understand it, how president johnson can send troops to vietnam but cannot send troops to selma, alabama, to protect people whose only desire is to register to vote." the next thing i knew, i had been admitted to the local hospital in selma. amy goodman: explain that moment where you decided to move forward, because i don't think the history we learn records those small acts that are actually gargantuan acts of bravery. talk about-i mean, you saw the weapons the police arrayed against you. what propelled you forward, congressmember lewis? rep. john lewis: well, my mother, my father, my grandparents, my
LINKTV
Dec 24, 2012 3:00pm PST
? we want our freedom and want it now. amy goodman: we spend today's hour looking at the bloody struggle to obtain-and protect- voting rights in this country. our guest is the former chair of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. now 13 term congressman john lewis. >> it is so important for people to understand, to know that people are suffering, struggling. some have died for the right to participate. the boat is the most powerful nonviolent tool that we have a democratic society. >> across that bridge, life lessons for change. with congress member john lewis. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. amy goodman: we spend today's hour looking at the bloody struggle to obtain-and protect- voting rights in this country. since 2010, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor a
WHUT
Dec 6, 2012 6:00pm EST
the violence happening in egypt today. what is happening at the presidential palace at the moment, the violence, without the protection of the country, is an announcement from the country and president that they do not hold their responsibility to protect the country. >> the egyptian army has deployed tanks outside of the presidential palace in cairo and six people have died in clashes between supporters and opponents of president morsi. we will speak to sharif abdel kouddous. >> this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from doha, qatar. egyptian forces have deployed outside a cairo after violent clashes between pro and anti- government demonstrators left six people dead and more than 400 injured. the violence marked a major escalation in the dispute over mohamed mursi's effort to hold a referendum on a new constitution later this month shortly after he asserted wide-ranging powers. fighting continues today with supporters and opponents clashing in the streets of cairo. on wednesday, opposition leader mohamad held the
WHUT
Dec 18, 2012 6:00pm EST
at sandy hook elementary school. on monday, noah pozner and jack pinto, 06 years old, were laid to rest in small caskets. more funerals are slated today including two more 6-year-old victim's, james mattioli and jessica rekos. at the white house, president obama convened a meeting with top officials to discuss ways to respond to the newtown massacre, including potential proposals for gun control. pressed for details, white house press secretary jay carney reduced offer any specifics on how obama plans to address the nation's gun violence. >> is a complex problem that will require a complex solution. no single piece of legislation, no single action will fully address the problem. >> in the aftermath of the newtown massacre, a number of pro-and lawmakers are signaling a new willingness to soften opposition to restrictions on weapons. senator joe manchin of west virginia, a longtime advocate of so-called gun rights, said when it comes to gun control, "everything should be on the table." virginia senator mark warner said he would back a stricter rules, calling the massacre a game chang
LINKTV
Dec 7, 2012 3:00pm PST
systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe economies hold the key to understanding ancient societies. archaeologist william sanders. the economy of any given human group, any culture, is a powerful factor that affects the rest of that culture -- the social organization, the political institutions, even the ideology, the religion of a people. from my perspective, the economy of a group is one of the most powerful determinants of human behavior. keach: to archaeologists, all economies fall somewhere on a spectrum from simple to complex. in a simple economy, people grow or gather all the food they eat. they make all the things they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are depe
LINKTV
Dec 13, 2012 3:00pm PST
runaway-- a maverick cell that we know is a cancer cell. this is the way that we look at people's dna. dna is much too small to actually see, even under a high powered microscope. but, we can use biochemical reactions to amplify the dna. successive mutations to the hereditary material of certain cells produce oncogenes-- "on" switches that accelerate cell growth. tumor suppressor genes, "off" switches that restrict growth, may also mute or... become lost from the hereditary makeup of a cell. when this happens, a cell can make billions of copies of its abnormal self. the excess tissue forms a mass-- a tumor. some tumors are benign... they don't invade nearby tissue or spread to other parts of the body. but a malignant tumor is cancer. its cells can invade and destroy healthy tissue, and spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph system. when we get that tumor and we look at the molecular changes in the tumor, we're kind of looking at the end stage. it's not the end stage of the disease for the patient but it's kind of the end product. what we really need to under
LINKTV
Dec 13, 2012 8:00am PST
cycle? begin with a w. - one. - one. okay. let's suppose i swing it at twice the frequency. how long would it take for one cycle? not everybody be seeing what most people be seeing. check the neighbor and see if the neighbor knows what the time is for one complete cycle, when it shook at two hertz. what's the answer, gang? how many say a half? all right, all right. let's suppose i told you i shake it back and forth... [makes sounds] ...seven times per second. what's the frequency? - 1/7. - seven. be careful, be careful, be careful. - do you see what happened? - yeah. [laughter] you all expected me to ask what's the--what's the time. i'm gonna call that time begin with the p. period. period. and you all expected me to ask you that. be careful in school because i didn't ask you that. i asked you a different question. what's the frequency? seven. next friday, when we take our exam, you start to read--"oh, i know what the answer to this is," even before you have the question. be careful, the question might be different than what you think it's gonna be. so, again, if i shake this ba
LINKTV
Dec 21, 2012 3:00pm PST
and sanctions, we look at a new film "road map to apartheid." >> i have been able to visit israel and palestine on more than two occasions. and what i experienced there was such a cruel reminder of a at a painful to protest south africa. we were largely controlled in the same way. >> we will speak with the israeli and south african born co-director of the film, then reverend billy on the end of the world. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. people across the united states are expected to join a moment of silence at 9:30 this morning to mark one week since the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. last friday morning, adam lanza opened fire at the school, killing 20 children and six adults. a series of back-to-back wakes and funerals are continuing for the victims. those mourned on thursday include catherine hubbard, benjamin wheeler, jesse lewis, and allison wyatt, all aged six, and grace mcdonnell, age 7. the service was held in new york for teacher anne marie murphy, wh
LINKTV
Dec 11, 2012 8:00am PST
frequency. high frequency because the sun's electrons are shaking at high rates. we'll gonna learn later on, if you take an electron and shake it back and forth, you'll get a wave in space that will shake back and forth at the very same frequency. so it stands for a reason, something of a high temperature with a lot of molecular motion, okay, a lot of charges moving, moving, moving, that that high temperature would give you a high frequency. so this is not counterintuitive. sometimes, we learn things that are kinda a little bit against common sense. we have to look a little deeper till we find out, "hey, it fits after all." this one, we don't. it makes sense that a high temperature would emit a high frequency. if you take a piece of metal, you guys can all see this. you're seeing this piece of metal because light is being reflected from the metal and go to your eyes. but if i turned all the lights out, you wouldn't be able to see this metal. but what i could do is i could start to heat it, maybe i could pass an electric current through it. and i could heat it, heat it, heat it, and
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2012 8:00am PST
different for people at rest. it turned out the speed of travel for that particular case where we go from 2 hours to 2 1/2 hours was 60% the speed of light. you saw the film that kinda got into all the stuff about counting flashes, counting flashes and all that sort of things. would you like to see that nice and succinct so there's no question? so when you look at what i'm gonna put on the board, boom, it all makes sense? time dilation comes alive. would you like to see that? i can do that for you right on that empty part of the board. would you like to see it? never mind the talk, never mind the rhetoric. let's get to it, huh?. here's time dilation. hey-ey-ey. all right, huh? - that do it for you? - yeah. now...what's that mean? this is derived in the footnote of your textbook, is that not true? simple pythagorean theorem, right? geometry, okay? i won't go through the elaboration now. but it just states that the time, the funny business, time. the time that one will experience due to relativistic effects-- meaning really motion effects, huh? the time that one will experience will have to
LINKTV
Dec 14, 2012 3:00pm PST
begin to learn language and other symbolic systems at birth. in time, they become a part of who we are and how we perceive the world. still, it's difficult for those of us in one culture to fully understand the symbolic systems of another. for archaeologists, the task is even more complex. the cultures they study can no longer be directly observed. archaeologist david webster. webster: suppose i came into this stadium a week, or even a century, after all the people left. how would i figure out what happened here ? what this arena was used for ? this is the dilemma facing archaeologists. symbols are of fundamental importance in understanding any human culture because they're so laden with meaning. but they're not very durable, and even if we find them, often we can't decode them. in this case, though, i'm in luck because of this -- writing. writing is a set of graphic symbols that is directly or indirectly related to language. keach: we use writing to convey very specific information, from introducing team members to explaining the referee's hand signals. this detailed guide brings
LINKTV
Dec 25, 2012 8:00am PST
our first conversation, dr. matÉ talked about his work as the staff physician at the portland hotel in vancouver, canada, a residence and harm reduction facility in downtown eastside, a neighborhood with one the densest concentrations of drug addicts in north america. the portland hosts the only legal injection site in north america, a center that's come under fire from canada's conservative government. i asked dr. matÉ to talk about his patients. >> the hardcore drug addicts that i treat, but according to all studies in the states, as well, are, without exception, people who have had extraordinarily difficult lives. and the commonality is childhood abuse. in other words, these people all enter life under extremely adverse circumstances. not only did they not get what they need for healthy development, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain bio
LINKTV
Dec 12, 2012 8:00am PST
water here? do you think all the water molecules in that glass are moving at the same speed all the time? how many say, "oh, yes. at exactly the same speed all the time." stand up. nobody. how many say, "well, there's a whole distribution of speeds "and the average that relates to that which we call temperature"? show of hands. yay, we got the idea. but you have all kinds of speeds in there, gang. you've got fast ones, you've got slow ones. you've got some at absolute zero in a moment-- [makes sound] --when it comes to a dead halt, boom, that corresponds to absolute zero. the next minute, something hits it, bam, bam, bam. they're moving in all kinds of speeds. so you got a distribution of speeds. and the distribution goes something like this. it's like the distribution of our test scores. remember how your test scores were? score, number--no. here was the score here and the number of people getting the score? well, the same type of thing here. this would be the temperature or we could say the motion or the kinetic energy. the kinetic energy of molecules in a glass of water versus the num
LINKTV
Dec 27, 2012 8:00am PST
the onset of the so-called fiscal cliff. obama and republican leaders remain at a crossroads on reaching a budget deal before the combination of spending cuts and tax hikes kicks in with the new year. on wednesday, treasury secretary timothy geithner told congress the u.s. will reach its federal borrowing limit on new year's eve, threatening the same default that was narrowly avoided last year. in a letter to lawmakers, geithner vowed to take extraordinary measures to avoid a new default but said any remedies would only be short- term. the u.s. has acknowledged for the first time a carried out a september drone strike that killed 11 people in yemen. the victims were packed into a truck on a desert road in a town of radda when they're struck by a missile. the washington post reports the yemeni government tried to hide u.s. responsibility for the attack by taking credit for carrying it out. the yemeni government also initially claimed only militants were killed in the strike, or forced to withdraw that claim after mourners tried to bring the dead bodies to the gates of the preside
LINKTV
Dec 20, 2012 3:00pm PST
now!" >> in a single gun law cannot solve all of these problems. we're going to have to look at mental health issues, look at schools. there'll be a whole range of things that joe's group looks at. >> as president, bows new action on gun control, we look at the end violence from newtown, connecticut to the streets of chicago, were nearly 500 people have been murdered this year. we will speak with goldie taylor. both her dad and brother were murdered. for years he owned a gun. on monday, she give it up. rhonda lee has been fired for defending her short, natural hairstyle on facebook. to the bribery aisle. how walmart got its way in mexico. >> and mexico, and a lever to tell a bribery and one of the world's largest corporations -- walmart. >> an ever imagined i was opposing such a super power. >> in april, the new york times revealed how wal-mart's leaders hushed up evidence of widespread bribery by the largest foreign subsidiary. now the times examines the relentless campaign of bribes behind wal-mart's most controversial store in mexico, in the data supermarket built in the shad
LINKTV
Dec 10, 2012 8:00am PST
, we're going to look at not only traditional ways we can help our children learn language, but we'll also explore some interesting new ideas about laying foundations for later success in reading and writing. it's an area of study we call emergent literacy, and i think you'll find it fascinating and helpful. as always in this series, we'll observe children in a number of different programs-- head start, family day care homes, university schools, and private child care centers. and we'll listen to their teachers as they describe some of the methods they use to enhance children's language and literacy development. teacher: no way. hendrick: the task of learning all the intricacies of language can be a daunting one, and it doesn't always go smoothly for our children or for us. [boy "counting"] 5. teacher: so, there are about 5? hendrick: as caregivers, we place such an important role in helping our children learn to be fluent, to communicate with others, and eventually, to read and write. teacher: use your words, adrian. tell lee, "those are my beans." beans. my beans. beans. woman, voic
LINKTV
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm PST
governments at ryerson university, a spokeswoman for itamar movement and a member of the eel river bar for station. welcome to "democracy now!" start off why the name of the movement, "idle no more." >> it is really symbolic of trying to get people organized at the grassroots level. for many decades, we have the scenario where politicians in canada are making decisions over the lives of first nations communities across this country and first asian leaders who are trapped in the system under the legislation that we have the controls every single action and decision they make, which relieves the grassroots people out of the decision making process. for traditional indigenous governments in canada, the grass-roots people are the real decision makers. they have been kept in the dark of what is going on. what we tried to do for this movement is come up withteach- ins, information that helped power the grassroots to let them know what is the threat against them and take action against it, regardless of what is happening at the political level. >> pamela palmater, kenny said little about what's s
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2012 3:00pm PST
at a unique ranch. >> the overall theme is, wow, it's pretty spectacular. >> then, farming in the city? sound impossible? not for these folks. >> this is my land, but it's everybody's land. >> next, meet a farmer and a chef who make the perfect pair--terally. >> i think pears are great because they're--i like the versatility. >> then, ever wonder how to pick the best summertime produce? we've got the tricks of the trade from a pro. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [moo] >> here in the tiny town of santa margarita, they have a population of only 1,300. but what they lack in size, they more than make up for in history. that's thanks to its legendary occupant, the santa margarita ranch, one of the oldest, continuously operated cattle ranches in california, and one that draws oohs and ahs from both its visitors and owners. >> the overall theme is, wow, it's pretty spectacular. most people that look at it, just go, ooh, blows you asay. >> this was the most idyllic place in the county. and i really do believe, today, it is truly one of the crown jewels of san luis obispo county. >> i
LINKTV
Dec 12, 2012 3:00pm PST
knighthood, a sculptor who caught the public's interest with his drawings, d rary at with a common touch. (henry moore) recently, there was a book published on my work by some jungian psychologist, a very good writer named nauman. i think the title was the archetypal world of henry moore and he sent me a copy, which he asked me to read. but after the first chapter i thought i better stop because it explained too much. and i thought it might stop me from ticking over if i went on and knew it all. (narrator) moore was english to the bone, he carved his reputation in english elm and boxwood, cumberland alabaster, and portland stone. when his art made him wealthy he turned to bronze and marble, but he never turned away from england. for all its rain and taxes it was h and he cleared a new path for english art. (anthony caro) you look at the history of english art, and it's pretty miserable after constable and turner and so on, and henry, somehow, was competing with braque and picasso and so on. you know, he was in that same league. and so it made people realize you can be an artist - a
LINKTV
Dec 14, 2012 8:00am PST
problems. for the whole child, especially at this age, learning isn't work. it's a joy, a pleasure, and something to look forward to every day. woman: why does his nose go up and down? woman: where else have we seen tadpoles? child: there's grass in there. hendrick: this is especially true as more and more teachers combine the more conventional and traditional styles of teaching with the new and creative learning techniques-- techniques that emerge when the educator teaches by collaboration rather than by instruction. woman: is it dark in there? hello. i'm joae hendrick, author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at what we call cognitive development and what we can do to enhance our children's ability to think, reason, remember information, and solve problems. we'll observe children in a number of different programs-- head start, family day-care homes, university schools, and private child-care centers-- and we'll listen to their teachers as they describe some of the methods they use to enhance their children's learning. wha
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